Frankenstein (Bantam Classics)

By Mary Shelley
Binding:Mass Market Paperback
Publisher:Bantam Classics, (6/1/1984)
Language:English



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"I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion." A summer evening's ghost stories, lonely insomnia in a moonlit Alpine's room, and a runaway imagination--fired by philosophical discussions with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley about science, galvanism, and the origins of life--conspired to produce for Marry Shelley this haunting night specter. By morning, it had become the germ of her Romantic masterpiece, Frankenstein.

Written in 1816 when she was only nineteen, Mary Shelley's novel of "The Modern Prometheus" chillingly dramatized the dangerous potential of life begotten upon a laboratory table. A frightening creation myth for our own time, Frankenstein remains one of the greatest horror stories ever written and is an undisputed classic of its kind.
 
 
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"Frankenstein (Bantam Classics)"
By Mary Shelley

Average Rating:

This book has not been rated


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 General reading guide discussion questions to be used with ANY book your book club or reading group might be discussing.
 
 

  1. Is Robert Walton's ambition similar to Frankenstein's, as Frankenstein believes? 
     
  2. Why is the fifteen-year-old Frankenstein so impressed with the oak tree destroyed by lightning in a thunderstorm? 
     
  3. Why does Frankenstein become obsessed with creating life? 
     
  4. Why is Frankenstein filled with disgust, calling the monster "my enemy," as soon as he has created him? (p. 62) 
     
  5. What does the monster think his creator owes him? 
     
  6. Why does Frankenstein agree to create a bride for the monster, then procrastinate and finally break his promise? 
     
  7. Why can't Frankenstein tell anyoneeven his father or Elizabethwhy he blames himself for the deaths of William, Justine, and Henry Clerval? 
     
  8. Why doesn't Frankenstein realize that the monster's pledge "I shall be with you on your wedding-night" threatens Elizabeth as well as himself? (p. 173) 
     
  9. Why does Frankenstein find new purpose in life when he decides to seek revenge on the monster "until he or I shall perish in mortal conflict"? (p. 206) 
     
  10. Why are Frankenstein and his monster both ultimately miserable, bereft of human companionship, and obsessed with revenge? Are they in the same situation at the end of the novel? 
     
  11. Why doesn't Walton kill the monster when he has the chance?
For Further Reflection
  1. Was it wrong for Frankenstein to inquire into the origins of life? 
     
  2. What makes the creature a monster rather than a human being? 
     
  3. Is the monster, who can be persuasive, always telling the truth?


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